BEGIN:VCALENDAR PRODID:-//Microsoft Corporation//Outlook 16.0 MIMEDIR//EN VERSION:2.0 METHOD:REQUEST X-MS-OLK-FORCEINSPECTOROPEN:TRUE BEGIN:VTIMEZONE TZID:AUS Eastern Standard Time BEGIN:STANDARD DTSTART:16010401T030000 RRULE:FREQ=YEARLY;BYDAY=1SU;BYMONTH=4 TZOFFSETFROM:+1100 TZOFFSETTO:+1000 END:STANDARD BEGIN:DAYLIGHT DTSTART:16011007T020000 RRULE:FREQ=YEARLY;BYDAY=1SU;BYMONTH=10 TZOFFSETFROM:+1000 TZOFFSETTO:+1100 END:DAYLIGHT END:VTIMEZONE BEGIN:VEVENT ATTENDEE;CN=GRP-CCC;RSVP=TRUE:mailto:grp-ccc@rmiteduau.onmicrosoft.com ATTENDEE;CN="Peter Fairbrother";RSVP=TRUE:mailto:peter.fairbrother@rmit.edu .au ATTENDEE;CN="Kate Farhall";RSVP=TRUE:mailto:katherine.farhall@rmit.edu.au ATTENDEE;CN=peter.turnbull@bristol.ac.uk;RSVP=TRUE:mailto:peter.turnbull@br istol.ac.uk ATTENDEE;CN="GRP-CPOW Members";RSVP=TRUE:mailto:GRP-cpow@rmiteduau.onmicros oft.com ATTENDEE;CN="Anthony Forsyth";ROLE=OPT-PARTICIPANT;RSVP=TRUE:mailto:anthony .forsyth@rmit.edu.au ATTENDEE;CN="Annie Delaney";ROLE=OPT-PARTICIPANT;RSVP=TRUE:mailto:annie.del aney@rmit.edu.au ATTENDEE;CN="Karen Douglas";ROLE=OPT-PARTICIPANT;RSVP=TRUE:mailto:karen.dou glas@rmit.edu.au ATTENDEE;CN="Sara Charlesworth";ROLE=OPT-PARTICIPANT;RSVP=TRUE:mailto:sara. charlesworth@rmit.edu.au ATTENDEE;CN="Amanda Coles";ROLE=OPT-PARTICIPANT;RSVP=TRUE:mailto:amanda.col es@deakin.edu.au ATTENDEE;CN="Cathy Brigden";ROLE=OPT-PARTICIPANT;RSVP=TRUE:mailto:cathy.bri gden@rmit.edu.au ATTENDEE;CN="Charlotte Yates";ROLE=OPT-PARTICIPANT;RSVP=TRUE:mailto:c.yates @exec.uoguelph.ca ATTENDEE;CN="Meagan Tyler";ROLE=OPT-PARTICIPANT;RSVP=TRUE:mailto:meagan.tyl er@rmit.edu.au CATEGORIES:Events and Booking CLASS:PUBLIC CREATED:20190402T234415Z DESCRIPTION:"Can work get any worse? Working in the Single European Market" \nProfessor Peter Turnbull will draw on his work on transport to refer to CRIMT < https://cpow.org.au/partnerships/crimt/> themes of institutional experime ntation and better work.\n\n“Empirical studies of (strategic) human reso urce management (HRM) offer support for investments in people that enhance their skills and increase the (opportunity) costs of job switching (e.g. by paying a wage above the worker’s ‘transfer earnings’\, otherwise known as ‘rent-sharing’). This enables the firm to retain valuable hum an capital that (over time) becomes difficult for rivals to emulate (due t o path dependencies\, social complexity and causal ambiguity). Researchers invariably draw on the ‘resource-based view’ (RBV) of the firm to exp lain these empirical results as investments in human resources are deemed to be valuable\, rare\, inimitable\, non-substitutable\, and can be exploi ted through organisation (VRINO)\, most notably via adroitly managed HRM p olicies and practices. However there are two distinct causal mechanisms th at explain how firms create economic rents (i.e. above normal returns on t heir investments)\, namely resource-picking (selecting resources) and capa bility-building (developing resources) (Makadok\, 2001). Both the theory o f strategic HRM and the empirical evidence purported to support the RBV te nds to overlook the possibility of rent generation via strategic factor ma rkets (SFMs) as these markets (e.g. the external market for labour) are ty pically assumed to be ‘perfectly competitive’ (Chadwick and Dabu\, 200 9: 262). Put differently\, strategic HRM looks inside rather than outside the firm to explain the relationship between people and performance. But w hat if the firm is a monopsonist (single-buyer) in the labour market? What if the firm can recruit labour from many different labour markets with di fferent standards of living and very different labour laws? Most firms in Europe compete in a single product market (e.g. transport markets with ful l cabotage) but can hire labour from 28 different labour markets (soon to be 27 in the event of Brexit). The result is very high profits (performanc e) but some of the worst conditions of employment imaginable in a trading bloc that purports to be a ‘social market’ and not simply a ‘single market’ (e.g. bonded labour and other forms of modern-day slavery). Sure ly work in sectors such as (international) transport cannot get any worse? ”\n\n \n\nThe event will take place at \nSwanston Academic Building (80 )\, Level 6\, Room 5\, \non the 9th of April (Tuesday) 2019.\n\nPlease pen cil the date in your calendars and RSVP by accepting this invitation or by sending me an email: \npeter.nowotnik@rmit.edu.au \n\nAbout our guest:\n\nProfessor Peter Turnbull joined the D epartment of Management at Bristol University in 2015 after 18 years as Pr ofessor of Human Resource Management & Labour Relations at Cardiff Busines s School\, Cardiff University.\n\nHe previously held posts at the Universi ties of Leeds\, Warwick and London School of Economics\, and visiting prof essorships and fellowships at Queen’s University (Belfast)\, La Trobe\, Monash\, Melbourne and Sydney (Australia) and Cornell (USA). In 2011\, Pro fessor Turnbull was Visiting Academic Fellow at the International Labour O rganization (Geneva).\n\nProfessor Turnbull is a graduate of the Universit y of Leeds (BA Econ)\, Warwick University (MA Industrial Relations)\, and Cardiff University (PhD\, Conflict on the Waterfront). He is an Academic F ellow\, Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) and a memb er of the Advisory\, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS) Arbitrati on Panel.\n\n\n#HumanResources #Management #Labour #Work #Employment #Law #Transport #BetterWork\n\n \n\nCentre for People\, Organisation and Work ( CPOW)\nCollege of Business\, RMIT University\nGPO Box 2476V\, Melbourne VI C 3001 Australia\nTel: +61 3 9925 5922\nE-mail: peter.nowotnik@rmit.edu.au \nWebsite: cpow.org.au \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n DTEND;TZID="AUS Eastern Standard Time":20190409T190000 DTSTAMP:20190402T233237Z DTSTART;TZID="AUS Eastern Standard Time":20190409T170000 LAST-MODIFIED:20190402T234415Z LOCATION:080.06.005 ORGANIZER;CN="Peter Nowotnik":mailto:peter.nowotnik@rmit.edu.au PRIORITY:5 SEQUENCE:4 SUMMARY;LANGUAGE=en-au:CPOW Event (09/04/2019): "Can work get any worse? Wo rking in the Single European Market" - Lecture by Prof. Peter Turnbull TRANSP:OPAQUE UID:040000008200E00074C5B7101A82E00800000000F093656DABE0D401000000000000000 0100000007339C9B8C027EA4FAD926E6653F73E9B X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

< img width=178 height=143 style='width:1.85in\;height:1.4916in' src="cid:im age003.jpg@01D4EA08.8EA430B0" align=left hspace=12 alt="https://www.neweur ope.eu/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/electroniceu.png" v:shapes="Picture_x002 0_3">"\;Can work get any worse? Working in the S ingle European Market"\;
Professor Peter Turnbull will d raw on his work on transport to refer to CRIMT themes of institutional experimentation< /i> and \;better work.

“\;Empirical studies of ( strategic) human resource management (HRM) offer support for investments i n people that enhance their skills and increase the (opportunity) costs of job switching (e.g. by paying a wage above the worker’\;s ‘\;tr ansfer earnings’\;\, otherwise known as ‘\;rent-sharing’\;) . This enables the firm to retain valuable human capital that (over time) becomes difficult for rivals to emulate (due to path dependencies\, social complexity and causal ambiguity). Researchers invariably draw on the R 16\;resource-based view’\; (RBV) of the firm to explain these empiric al results as investments in human resources are deemed to be valuable\, r are\, inimitable\, non-substitutable\, and can be exploited through organi sation (VRINO)\, most notably via adroitly managed HRM policies and practi ces. However there are two distinct causal mechanisms that explain how fir ms create economic rents (i.e. above normal returns on their investments)\ , namely resource-picking (selecting resources) and capability-building (d eveloping resources) (Makadok\, 2001). Both the theory of strategic HRM an d the empirical evidence purported to support the RBV tends to overlook th e possibility of rent generation via strategic factor markets (SFMs) as th ese markets (e.g. the external market for labour) are typically assumed to be ‘\;perfectly competitive’\; (Chadwick and Dabu\, 2009: 262). Put differently\, strategic HRM looks inside rather than outside the firm to explain the relationship between people and performance. But what if t he firm is a monopsonist (single-buyer) in the labour market? What if the firm can recruit labour from many different labour markets with different standards of living and very different labour laws? Most firms in Europe c ompete in a single product market (e.g. transport markets with full cabota ge) but can hire labour from 28 different labour markets (soon to be 27 in the event of Brexit). The result is very high profits (performance) but s ome of the worst conditions of employment imaginable in a trading bloc tha t purports to be a ‘\;social market’\; and not simply a ‘\; single market’\; (e.g. bonded labour and other forms of modern-day sl avery). Surely work in sectors such as (international) transport cannot ge t any worse?”\;

 \;

The event will take place at  \;
Swanston Academic Building (80)\, Level 6\, Room 5\,
on the 9th of April (Tues day) 2019.

Please p encil the date in your calendars and RSVP by accepting this invitation or by sending me an email:
peter.nowotnik@rmit.edu.au< o:p>

About our guest:

Professor Peter Turnbull joined the Department of Management at Bristol University in 2015 after 18 years as Professor of Human Resource Management &\; La bour Relations at Cardiff Business School\, Cardiff University.

He previously held posts at the Uni versities of Leeds\, Warwick and London School of Economics\, and visiting professorships and fellowships at Queen’\;s University (Belfast)\, L a Trobe\, Monash\, Melbourne and Sydney (Australia) and Cornell (USA). In 2011\, Professor Turnbull was Visiting Academic Fellow at the Internationa l Labour Organization (Geneva).

Professor Turnbull is a graduate of the University of Leeds (BA Eco n)\, Warwick University (MA Industrial Relations)\, and Cardiff University (PhD\, Conflict on the Waterfront). He is an Academic Fellow\, Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) and a member of the Advisory \, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS) Arbitration Panel.


#HumanResources #M anagement #Labour #Work #Employment #Law #Transport #BetterWork

 \;

Centre for People\, Organisation and Work (CPOW)
College of Busines s\, \;RMIT University
GPO Box 2476V\, Melbourne VIC 3001 Australia
Tel: +61 3 9925 5922< /span>
E-mail:&n bsp\;peter.nowotnik@rmit.edu.au

Website: \;cpow.org.au

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CPOWtwitter1 \; \; CPOWlinkedin1

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